ZOOM MEETINGS & VIRTUAL WEBCASTS

April 20, 2021 / VIRTUAL WEBCAST

Runaway income and wealth inequality have amplified racial and gender wealth gaps, produced distorted and unfair economic outcomes, and constrained our societal potential.

A just, effective, and popular antidote: progressive taxation.
Over three years after the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, and with Congress now considering corporate tax increases, what does the current policy and political landscape look like? How should we design a wealth tax, and how would it interact with the existing US tax code? And how can we prevent tax avoidance among the nation’s wealthiest people?

Join us for a conversation about the economic and social benefits of progressive taxation and the path forward with opening remarks by Senator Elizabeth Warren.

 

Panel Featuring:

Amanda Fischer
Policy Director at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth

Darrick Hamilton
Roosevelt Institute Fellow
University Professor and Founding Director of Institute for the Study of Race,
Stratification and Political Economy at The New School

Lindsay Owens | Moderator
Roosevelt Institute Fellow
Interim Executive Director at the Groundwork Collaborative

Kitty Richards
Roosevelt Institute Fellow
Strategic Advisor at the Groundwork Collaborative

APRIL 7, 2021 / VIRTUAL WEBCAST

There’s no such thing as climate-neutral policy. The Biden-Harris administration is hoping to invest $3 trillion on an economic and infrastructure plan: What does that mean for climate change and environmental justice? Who will—and should—benefit? And what will a “green” recovery require? Join us for a conversation about what a climate-forward economy means–and what we must do to achieve it.

Panel Featuring:

Rhiana Gunn-Wright
Director, Climate Policy, Roosevelt Institute

Brandon Hurlbut
Co-Founder of Boundary Stone Partners 
Former US Department of Energy Chief of Staff, Obama Administration

Lenore Palladino
Assistant Professor of Economics & Public Policy, UMass Amherst
Roosevelt Institute Fellow

John Washington
Organizer and Political Educator, People’s Action

FEBRUARY 17, 2021 / VIRTUAL WEBCAST

What are the hallmarks of a strong presidential transition? Join us for a conversation about presidential transitions past and present—and a look at the Biden-Harris transition.

Panel Featuring:

Edward E. “Ted” Kaufman
Former US Senator from Delaware & Co-Chair of the Biden-Harris Transition Team

Felicia Wong
President & CEO, Roosevelt Institute

Christie George
Senior Advisor at New Media Ventures (NMV)

DECEMBER 10, 2020 / ZOOM

As the COVID-19 recession continues, millions of people have lost their jobs and face potential long-term unemployment. Policymakers and practitioners looking to address this are turning to workforce training and development programs to help workers rebuild their skills. Yet, training programs that do not address underlying labor market power dynamics between employers and workers may perpetuate wage, income, and other labor market inequities.

Join the Roosevelt Institute and WorkRise to explore this issue with economists Suresh Naidu and Aaron Sojourner as they present “Employer Power and Employee Skills: Understanding Workforce Training Programs in the Context of Labor Market Power,” new research analyzing how workforce training and development programs can be designed and structured to address labor market power dynamics and increase worker power. They will be joined by leaders in industry, labor, and workforce development to discuss their findings and implications for the workforce development field.

Panel Featuring:

 

Suresh Naidu

FELLOW, ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE; PROFESSOR IN ECONOMICS AND INTERNATIONAL AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS, COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Aaron Sojourner
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR, CARLSON SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
Amanda Cage

PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, NATIONAL FUND FOR WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS; MEMBER, WORKRISE LEADERSHIP BOARD

Lenore Friedlaender

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT, 32BJ SEIU

Howard Rothschild

PRESIDENT, REALTY ADVISORY BOARD ON LABOR RELATIONS

Elisabeth Jacobs

ACTING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, WORKRISE; SENIOR FELLOW, CENTER ON LABOR, HUMAN SERVICES, AND POPULATION, URBAN INSTITUTE

DECEMBER 3, 2020 / ZOOM

As the President-elect prepares to take office amid a global pandemic and a worsening economy, he must also face–and address–a broken political and economic system. Decades of policymaking centered on markets and reinforced by strategic racism have left our country deeply vulnerable.  

What can the incoming administration do to address the multiple crises we face and transform the economy? How do we build a powerful multiracial coalition that can create a democratically accountable, effective government that can deliver for all of us? Join us for this important discussion.

Panel Featuring: 

 

Felicia Wong

PRESIDENT & CEO, ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE

Rhiana Gunn-Wright

DIRECTOR, CLIMATE POLICY, ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE

Bharat Ramamurti

MANAGING DIRECTOR, CORPORATE POWER, ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE

Elliot Williams

CNN LEGAL ANALYST, HOST OF “MADE TO FAIL” PODCAST

OCTOBER 6, 2020 / ZOOM

 The twin health and economic crises of COVID-19 have hit the South particularly hard—exacerbating already-steep inequities. The South has demonstrably higher shares of populations at greatest risk, lower rates of paid sick leave coverage, lower rates of health coverage due to failure to expand Medicaid, higher poverty rates, and fewer resources to navigate these crises. Yet the South also has some of the most resilient communities and incredible organizations ready to help meet today’s needs and fight for an equitable future.

Stacey Abrams, in conversation with Tom Perriello, will share new insights on what a progressive Southern strategy for an equitable recovery looks like—and how leaders across the South are innovating and building toward it. 

SEPTEMBER 23, 2020 / ZOOM

The current crisis continues to expose and exacerbate the fragility of a US economy marked by deep racial and economic inequality. As in the New Deal era under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, America needs a new set of policies to mitigate the pandemic and alleviate the suffering it has caused. And this time, it must be representative of America’s race, class, and gender diversity. 

Join Joseph E. Stiglitz, Darrick Hamilton, and Felicia Wong to discuss how we can create a True New Deal. 

Panel Featuring:

 

Joseph Stiglitz 

CHIEF ECONOMIST AND SENIOR FELLOW

Darrick Hamilton

FELLOW

Felicia Wong

PRESIDENT AND CEO

SEPTEMBER 9, 2020 / ZOOM

Join SEAP Executive Director, Leader Stacey Abrams, for a conversation about resources available to Black Farmers in the Southern Region.

Panel Featuring:

 

Cherie Bryant and Tammy Harris

SOUTHEASTERN AFRICAN AMERICAN FARMERS’ ORGANIC NETWORK (SAAFON)

Jacqueline A. Davis Slay

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OFFICE OF PARTNERSHIPS AND PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT, USDA

Brennan Washington

 SOUTHERN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE RESEARCH AND EDUCATION

 

Katherine Stewart

INTERIM LEGISLATIVE DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF CONGRESSWOMAN ALMA ADAMS (NC-12), VICE CHAIR, HOUSE AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE

AUGUST 13, 2020 / ZOOM

One year ago, the Business Roundtable (BRT), chaired by JPMorgan Chase & Co.’s Jamie Dimon, walked back 20+ years of its support of dominant corporate ideology in the US that puts shareholder interests above all others. The BRT called for corporations to promote “an economy that serves all Americans”—including workers, customers, suppliers, and communities at large.

But what, if anything, has changed in the last year? And what does true corporate accountability look like in the COVID-19 era, which has exposed more cracks in the foundation of our economy?

Panel Featuring:

 

Congressman Ro Khanna

Bharat Ramamurti

Janie Grice

UNITED FOR RESPECT LEADER

Keith Mestrich

PRESIDENT AND CEO, AMALGAMATED BANK

Rose Marcario

FORMER CEO, PATAGONIA

Lenore Palladino

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND PUBLIC POLICY, UMASS-AMHERST AND FELLOW AT THE ROOSEVELT INSTITUTE

Leo E. Strine, Jr.

OF COUNSEL AT WACHTELL, LIPTON, ROSEN & KATZ, AND FORMER CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE DELAWARE SUPREME COURT

AUGUST 5, 2020 / ZOOM

“The process of creating the racial wealth chasm begins with the failure to provide the formerly enslaved with the 40 acres they were promised. So the restitution has never been given, and it’s 155 years overdue.”

– William Darity Jr. in The New York Times

Join William “Sandy” Darity Jr., Dorian T. Warren, and Felicia Wong for a discussion of how the hidden rules of race have driven today’s wealth inequality—and how reparations are a critical and powerful tool to move forward.

MAY 1, 2020 / ZOOM

We’ve long argued that one of the greatest threats to people and an equitable economy is corporate power—and the COVID-19 crisis is, unfortunately, illustrating our point.

Policy responses to COVID-19 must center everyday Americans and small businesses, but legislation to date has fallen woefully short. To learn more about how we can promote an agenda that meets the scale of the problems we’re facing and ensures that large, concentrated businesses do not benefit disproportionately from this crisis, join Bharat Ramamurti, Roosevelt’s new Managing Director of Corporate Power, and Julie Margetta Morgan, Vice President of Research, for a conversation to walk through the benefits and drawbacks of the current federal relief packages and how we can advance solutions that rebalance public and private power in future legislation.

MARCH 20, 2020 / ZOOM

The economic situation has been fast-moving, and many of the challenges we are facing, and anticipating, are unprecedented. While the immediate effects of the coronavirus may spark a potential recession, underlying economic issues could make it worse and last longer for millions of people unless we act quickly and aggressively.

Join Roosevelt Institute, Groundwork Collaborative, and the Washington Center for Equitable Growth for a webinar on Friday, March 20 at 1PM EST, as we translate the latest in economic news, provide a snapshot of what may happen next, and share lessons from the 2008-2009 financial crisis that may apply to today.

March 22, 2021 / VIRTUAL WEBCAST

The Franklin D. Roosevelt Distinguished Public Service Awards honor individuals whose careers exemplify President Roosevelt’s extraordinary dedication to public service and seek to inspire a renewed national commitment to the principles for which FDR fought.

DPSA recipients have dedicated their lives to the public good, never limiting themselves to what seemed possible when they began. Each year, we celebrate their courage, commitment, and values.

We hope you will join us in recognizing our 2021 honorees:

  • Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ), Chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee

  • Liz Shuler, Secretary-Treasurer of the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO)

With special appearances by: 

  • The Honorable Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the House

  • Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Chair of the House Appropriations Committee

  • Lee Saunders, President of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME)

  • Lonnie Stephenson, President of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) 

  • Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA)

And musical performances by Steve Earle!

JANUARY 15, 2020 / NATIONAL PRESS CLUB
529 14TH STREET NW
WASHINGTON, DC

For decades, we have lived within neoliberalism—a way of thinking about politics and policymaking that has fueled economic insecurity, exacerbated racial inequality, entrenched corporate concentration, and failed to deliver promised growth. Activist movements across the globe, along with academics and policymakers, are now challenging what had been the neoliberal consensus. Increasingly, economists, political experts, and even politicians insist that there is “an alternative” to neoliberalism. But what is that alternative? What will make it real, and what are the stakes in this debate?

With the release of two papers focused on the empirical failures of neoliberalism and emerging alternatives, Roosevelt will be leading a panel discussion featuring Felicia Wong, Mike Konczal, Jamelle Bouie, Quinn Slobodian, Joelle Gamble.

About the Awards

The Four Freedoms Awards are presented to men and women whose achievements have demonstrated a commitment to the principles which President Roosevelt proclaimed in his historic speech to Congress on January 6, 1941, as essential to democracy: freedom of speech and expression, freedom of worship, freedom from want, freedom from fear.

The Roosevelt Institute has awarded the Four Freedoms Medals to some of the most distinguished Americans and world citizens of our time, including Presidents Truman, Carter, and Clinton; H.R.H. Princess Juliana of the Netherlands; Nelson Mandela; J. William Fulbright; Arthur Miller; and Desmond Tutu. The Awards are presented in New York every other year; international awards are given by the Roosevelt Stichting of the Netherlands on alternate years.

FOUR FREEDOMS AWARDS LAUREATES 2020

Like many other events, the Four Freedoms Awards ceremony had to be postponed on April 14 in Middelburg because of the Coronavirus pandemic.

People all over the world are confronted with the consequences of this pandemic. Millions of people live with the limitations of various forms of lockdown, which are supposed to stop the spread of the virus, hundreds of thousands of people have been infected by the virus, and thousands have died as a result.

These are definitely challenging times. With his positive vision of a world based on 4 freedoms, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt contrasted hope and faith with bitterness and fear in his own time. Following his example, the Four Freedoms Awards Laureates 2020 and the Roosevelt Foundation want to bring a message of hope to all those who now also live in fear and are limited in their freedom as a result of the pandemic and express their support to all those who are committed to their fellow man in this difficult time.

HYDE PARK, NY

In the past year, we’ve seen some inspiring moments: the highest Midterm turnout since 1914, felon re-enfranchisement in Florida, an overhaul of criminal justice in New York,  and progressive policies like universal basic income, the abolishment of the electoral college, free healthcare have taken a prominent role policy debates. Networks like ours must continue organizing, training and developing the emerging leaders that will change who writes the rules.

 

HYDE PARK 2019

Hyde Park is the network’s annual conference that brings together students and alumni from across the country for a weekend of training, planning, and networking. It’s the time where students are trained with the skills needed to grow your chapter, support and advance policy work, and where you’ll deepen your own personal leadership skills. The conference is open to our 2019-2020 national leadership cohort and a chapter representative from each network chapter.

Logistics & Details

DATES

Hyde Park runs from July 29th to August 4th. The week is broken up by the national leadership Retreat and Leadership Summit.

National Leadership Retreat

Our national leadership team is made up of student-led regional and policy teams, who help to ensure the network’s success each year by organizing our people, strategizing and supporting policy projects, communicating our message, and influencing decision-makers. At the national leadership retreat, the 2019-2020 National Leadership cohort is trained to help lead the network in the coming year. The retreat takes place from July 29th-July 30th.

Leadership Summit

In addition to preparing the national leadership team for their roles, Hyde Park is also a time to train and prepare the network’s chapter leadership. The leadership summit convenes our student chapter leadership representatives from across the network to help prepare them to lead successful chapters in the year to come. The summit takes place from August 1st – 4th.

HOUSING

All students will be housed at a motel within walking distance of the FDR Presidential Library. Student housing is covered by Roosevelt for all national leadership member and chapter representatives. Additional housing information will be provided following registration.

TRAVEL

All student travel to Hyde Park will be pre-booked and paid for by national staff. Students flying to New York, should expect to fly to New York City, and take Metro North train to Poughkeepsie. Additional travel logistics will be communicated following registration.

REGISTRATION

National Leadership members and 2019/2020 chapter heads will be contacted by national staff with registration information.

ALUMNI @ HYDE PARK

Alumni at Hyde Park coincides with the weekend of the student leadership summit. The weekend brings together alumni of the network for a weekend of networking, organizing, and celebrating. Over the course of the weekend, our alumni community will come together to think about how we can leverage the collective power of a network like ours to ensure that rules are getting rewritten, and we’re changing who gets to write them.